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of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
neighbor and mr. obama fri has to go to the fifth summit of the americas and in trinidad and he has already been told by the mexican the and especially the brazilian president, lula da silva, he was going to run into some really heavy criticism in trinidad if something can't be done for the embargo. so they're still a long way to go. it could go fast, it could go slow and in his miami speech last may candidate obama suggested it was going to go slow. he promised to keep the rest of the embargo he said because united states needed to be a relentless advocate of democracy, and of quote. but slowly or quickly is very clear that our current dysfunctional policy is coming to the end of its life. what do i mean by dysfunctional? i mean that the united states and cuba have not had formal relations since january feared, 1961. that was e leffinge presidents ago -- 11 presidents ago. in contrast the u.s. estrangement from this movie gets revolution after the bolshevik revolution and is a strain from the people's republic of china after the fall of chang that lasted 16, 22 years respectively. the five
hundreds. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrificed to bring about? >>> how to measure success in america's other war in afghanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look at an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in the middle of the war, welcome aboard an air ambulance. >>> and germany wants a million electric vehicles on the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if you woke up this morning and turned on the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement about what you were hearing out of afghanistan and iraq. more than 5,000 american troops have died in those two countries since troops were de
the celebration by singing god bless america and i hope you'll join them. . . the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. he had his sleeves and wakeful nights. he had his nightmares and yet he dreamt a dream that was trapped of the heart -- that was a draft of the heart and only his great heart could hold. he gave flesh to that the dream in the noble house of his thought where the sick were healed, the sphere broken, and the stranger welcomed. it is the age-old dream of the profits -- of the profitphets. there will be a bank would ge-- there will be a bank with yet -- there will be a banquet yet. the laugh, the sound of roses, the music -- may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ♪ ♪ dodd bless america -- god bless america ♪ landed that i love the ♪ stand beside her ♪ and the guide her ♪ through the night ♪ with the light from above ♪ from the mountain to the prairie ♪ to the ocean ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ died bless america -- god bless america ♪ land that i love ♪ stand beside her ♪ and a
aspires which is the history of the kgb in america. i don't think he fabricat the homo book you should be careful because in the same way i was careful whether or not i.f. stone hitchhiked to massachusetts so you do have some files that say he had conversations with some when he may or may not have known was the kgb agent. you can say that with confidence that there may be these documents which may say yes, we do not know that because we cannot say them so let's assume that they do. what do we know? 1936 i.f. stone had conversations with somebody who was a reporter working for the soviet wire service in america. he may or may not have known was a kgb agent and may or may not have been friendly or helpful. in 1936 he was a enthusiastic fellow traveler and very enthusiastic of the american communist party and premise supportive of tough soviet union in so far was the only country that supplied arms to the anish republic. also he was terrified of the threat of fascism. in 1937 i.f. stone of became his name because he was terrified fascism might come to america and his family was targeted.
apw were black because of blood. >> oliver: the only war america lpu could we have won? >> easily, easily. >> oliver: was itúqpw>=med fromy the start? >> you wanted an advisor who would tell him what he wanted to hear. in beirut, thanks.pw next news break, bottom of the t'r?ries with oliver north"q ÷y american infantryman can't be pushed, they have to be led from tzu front. this statue called follow me úwú/es tzu spirit of the the perilous business of war on the ground. on the gr north, this is war stories. coming to you from fort coming t georgia, home of the u.s. army infantry since 1918. during the 1960's and 70's, hundreds of thousands of young@@ soldiers honed their combat skills here. but american involvement in southeast asia began years before our first air and ground combat units arrived in 1965. early in the cold war against communists, the eisenhower administration spent billions fight against ho chi minh. supported himho chi minh. when he was our ally against the japanlá Ñ in world war ii. how did the united states find itself embroiled in vietnam fighting war th
he did lives on. for his family, he was a bargain. for america, and he was the defender of a dream. -- for his family, he was of guardian. >> we look at ted kennedy's legacy as the leading liberal in washington. welcome to "bbc world news." , broadcast you our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. >> i am mike embley in london. 70% -- 17% of the vote now counted. president karzai edges against his main rival. and one of iraq's influential leaders has died in exile in tehran. >> hello. he was the best known as american politician ever to make it -- never to make it to the white house. senator kidney -- kidnapping -- center -- senator kennedy died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer. he fought for so many causes, and the tributes have flowed in from friend and foe alike. but his career was limited by self-inflicted wounds. adam brooks reports. >> the death of edward kennedy, known as ted, leads a chasm in american politics. hughes was one of the most effective politicians of the last century -- he was one of the most effective politicians of the last century. his
and columnist ann coulter during a speech to the young america's foundation. this last about one hour and 15 minutes. >> boy, do we have a and now for you. we have ann coulter. first off, i like to welcome our viewers from c-span and a live web spain. i'm an intern with young america's foundation. young america's foundation is the premier organization that educates students on the principle of limited government, individual liberty, a strong national defense, and traditional values. for more information, please call our telephone number. or visit our web site. what did barack obama and ann coulter have in common? [laughter] nothing, thank god. [applause] ann coulter is now the author of seven "new york times was " a best-selling books, and i am sure there will be many more to come. she graduated with honors from cornell university, and no, mr. alderman, not the same school you attended. [applause] she then went on to practice law in new york city and even work for the senate judiciary committee. the conservative movement is so lucky that have an intelligent, articulate, and not to mention ex
cronkite. he was the most trusted man in america. he was the anchor for everybody i was voted down -- for everybody. i was voted down unanimously. they said it would look bad if he turns it down. so let's go to a more mainstream politician which we did. >> wanted to take walter cronkite would take the job? >> i knew that he was very much opposed to the vietnam war. six months before that, he had come back from vietnam and immediately called me and asked to see robert kennedy. the two of them thamet. he said that the senator had to run for president and he went on to say how they could not be one. -- that it could not be one. they would not like us less. kennedy said to him that he would run for president if you would run for the senate in new york. cronkite laughed and said that he could not because he did not live in new york, he lived in connecticut. secondly, he said he was not a democrat, he was registered as an independent. i knew he had those feelings about the war and he would take it seriously. he certainly couldn't out vote anyone else like to think of. >> that was 1968. >
need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
kennedy can be measured in no small part as a consequence of how we in america look at one another. how blacks look at whites, how gays looked straight, house traits lookit days. -- house streets look at today's -- how straights look at gays. and how we look at ourselves. when you were with him, you had to measure yourself against him. it always requires you to be larger than you were inclined to be. his death was not unlike his life. as we all know. overcoming pain and loss with a sense of dignity and pride that is amazing. he met his death in the same grave, generous terms that he lived his life. they could've been thinking about your father when he wrote, the will the fis fear when duty throws the gauntlet down the fate, when scorn compromises with death. this is heroism. your father was a historic figure. he was a heroic figure beyond that. i will remember and celebrate his life every single time i see a young, adolescent kids coping rather than cowering about having to make a decision about his sexuality. i will celebrate your father ever single time i see my granddaughter stand up
auxiliary. americana's your service as well. -- america honors your service as well. the governor of arizona is here as well. and mayor phil gordon, our host in phoenix. i want to acknowledge the president of the navajo nation. this was not on my original card, but you may have already heard from our, but i want to publicly acknowledge and thank the secretary to eisenhower who typed up the orders for the normandy invasion and is here today, and what an extraordinary story that is. [applause] members of the veterans of foreign wars, i am honored and humbled to stand before u.s. commander in chief of the finest military the world has ever known. [applause] we are joined by some of those who made it the finest force in the world. from the air force base, members of the 56th fighter wing. [applause] whether you wear the uniform today or war decades ago -- more expected to go, you are symbols of a fundamental truth is not powerful epidemic are military the strongest in the world, not the sophisticated systems that make us the most to danced. the true strength of our military lies in the spirit an
home training. immigration reform? this question came via e-mail at america's voice. during 2008, latino voters played and historic role turning four stage from red to blue. it's a defining issue for latino voters and president obama campaigned on a promise for this. how is he going to get comprehensive immigration reform done now. we've seen the dates flip a bit. what's doing on? >> what the president said throughout the campaign and in office is we have to have comprehensive immigration reform. my top person who is head of international governmental affairs, the question she asked before joining the administration is, is the president committed this and he absolutely is and he's pulled together members of congress, those who are supported of immigration reform and those who are not, brought them together in the white house and began to dialogue. we have someone working hard on the hill to see what measures we can do in the short-term but the real solution is long-term immigration reform. you mentioned the date has slipped. obviously there's a full plate but i think the preside
to the vfw on america's two foreign wars and the troops who are fighting them. you'll see it live right here in the "newsroom.." >>> two and a half months in the hurricane sen and bill and claude it light up the radar. hello, everyone. i'm kieyra phillips. you're live here in the "cnn newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> and they fought for you. who fights for them. american veterans focused health care. we're pushing forward on both fronts. a live address to the vfw in this hour and a congressional session of conservative opponents to the health plan. you know we've covered their causes and criseses to tainted equipment at v.a. hospitals. there are people stories, not number stories. we can't ignore numbers like these. almost a million unprocessed claims. if claims are denied it can take a year and a half, sometimes much longer to go through the appeals. factor in a passionate fight to overhaul the nation's health care system and this becomes the scene outside president's adegree. cnn's ed henry joins me live. how does it push into this for reform? we sure know they want it.
looked around and i saw america. i saw white people and i saw black people. and i saw men and i saw women and i saw english-speakers and spanish-speakers in our caucus. our diversity is our strength. and when you have a diverse group the way you create solidarity is through shared values. the kind of discussion we have when a vote comes up that seems like a tough vote for me because the way my district is or because i just have problems with them on the basis of conscience, the discussion is always on the level of what's right, what's good, what's right, never, what's in it for me, what's in it for the leadership? it never takes that kind of turn. and the democrats don't vote as a single bloc and some close and some unpredictable. we had a couple that took a long time to vote. but the net result of that is that through our diversity, we have our strength. now, you compare that to the other side which seems to operate on completely different principles. doesn't have anything even remotely resembling diversity in our caucus and it seems to fight the very idea of diversity. i remember one si
would say donations. >> advertising for products. >> public money, i am short. >> by taxes? >> america's cable companies created c-span is a public service, a private business initiative -- note government mandate, no government money. >> the department has begun sending out the first tuition payments to universities but dissipating indeed post 9/11 g.i. bill -- participating in the post 9/11 g.i. bill program. more on that from jim webb, a co-sponsor the bill. we'll also hear from eric shinseki and president obama. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is an honored have you with us today and is an honor for us to host this important celebration. earlier this year, george mason was privileged to be one of the many colleges and universities across the nations to commit itself to the yellow ribbon enhancement program. a provision of the post 9/11 g.i. bill of 2008, this initiative is designed to extend higher education funding for servicemen and women who served after the september 11, 2001 attacks. i know that members of that day still remain in all of our hearts. shock, horror, a tragedy. f
presidentle candidate and my choice was walter cronkite. anchor for everybody. trusted man in america. and i was voted down unanimously. everybody said, don't be silly. he'll never accept. we'll look bad when he turns it down so. let's go to a more mainstream politician, which we did. >> why did you think walter cronkite would even take the job? >> well i knew he was very much apposed to the vietnam war because about six months before that, he had come back from vietnam and immediately called me and asked to see senator robert kennedy, and two of them met. i with us there and he began by saying senator you have to run for president because this wore has got to end and went on to say how unwinning it was. said we would win a village in the daytime and have to give it back at the night. vietnamese in the south may not like the north, but they like us less. i knew and kennedy said to him, well then i'll run for president if you run for the senate in new york and cronkite laughed and said i can't. we're closing the first place, i don't live in new york. i live in connecticut and i'm not a demo
the worst run insurance companies in america. they predict he merged them they were poorly run and turn them into the biggest efficient. he is a doctor. he created the biggest insurance company in america for his shareholders. his stock went from nothing to being a very valuable. if you are a shareholder, you probably thought he got a lot of that out of nothing. he turned into an $80 billion company. it is nice to have shareholders who are mutual fund owners investing in united healthcare. he had a lot of stock in 1992. on paper, you can never defend anybody making a billion doctor -- dollars. it is very large, very comprehensive, and its shareholders were rewarded. it is like the government paid it. there are two sides to the story. . he created a massive company. he was in it very early. again, i'm not trying to defend him. certainly the taxpayers never paid united health care $1 billion. they are the single biggest contractor for medicare. they make on average about a 3.5% profit on their part d plan which is drugs and plan which is drugs and probably a 4% margin on their medicare advanta
going on in america? we'll converse that and trying to make health care fun, i think it's worth it. we've got comedians, we will make health care accessible and fun for america if it's the last thing we do. there's going to be like a magic trick. we're back after this. his coat is incredibly shiny and soft and very thick. everybody thinks he's the most handsome cat they've ever seen. [ woman announcing ] purina one for indoor cats... unlocks the brilliance of nature... with a natural fiber blend that helps minimize hairballs... and maintain a healthy weight. [ laurie ] he's a character. he brings so much laughter into this household. and he's the best-lookin' cat there is. [ announcer ] it's amazing what one can do. we're shopping for car insurance, and our friends said we should start here. good friends -- we compare our progressive direct rates, apples to apples, against other top companies, to help you get the best price. how do you do that? with a touch of this button. can i try that? [ uckles ] wow! good luck getting your remote back. it's all right -- i love this channel. shoppin
and his concern for america's least powerful. as he said so many years ago, the work goes on, the cause endures, and the dream will never die. that's all for this edition of "headliners and legend," i'm lester holt. thank you for watching. >> teddy. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in new york. ted kennedy was the last hurrah, the big baritone out there demanding justice for the left out people, the african-americans, native americans, the old person, the immigrant family that wanted to be american. the sick scared person waiting in the er for hours with something really wrong. why would a big looking guy like him, a rich guy, spend his life worrying about the people left out? was it tribal memory of his own people left out, sent away, told to go back where they came from? was it those old boston signs that said, irish need not apply? what was it that made health care such a crusade for this guy? who do you know who has a broken back who spends his life and time thinking about other people's troubles? was it because his older trouble was secretly sick most of
in america. so i would actually make this more small business-friendly than even the blue dogs did. if it was up to me, i'd say anybody with a payroll of less than million dollars or anybody with a number of employees less than 50 is exempt from the mandate. now we're going to take the flier. i see i only have a few minutes left. i'm just -- i have -- since i wrote about this in the book, i feel some -- i think it's okay for me to say this. i'm not pushing this. but it was part of my platform in 2004. [laughter] >> it's slightly revised. [applause] >> if i were going to do this, i actually argue in the book that we really don't need a mandate and i don't think mandates are going to be very popular. because mandating anything with the american people is never very popular which is why it makes me mad while the republicans think about sticking us with the mandates that we have today. [applause] >> but if i could do this any way i wanted to, this is a flier, i'm not lobbying for this. all i care about is the public option. i would give everybody under 25 or 30 medicaid for free. and i
'll have a final word on american hero and the family that held america's attention for half a century. remembering ted kennedy on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs "face the nation" with cbs news chief washington correspondent bob schieffer. and now from cbs news in washington, bob schieffer. captioning sponsored by cbs good morning again. joining us now first senator john mccain. senator, i understand that when vicki kennedy began calling people to speak at the wake on friday night that you were the first republican she called. i can understand why that was because you did have a very kind of special relationship with senator kennedy. you didn't always work together. a lot of the time you were on opposite sides but somehow you managed to keep this relationship going. how did you do that? >> i think it was probably because first of all we grew to respect each other. over time then have great affection for each other. you know, in this business& first you've got to establish respect. that respect sometimes was because of face-to-face discussions. sometimes for the record o
, america. >> good morning. it is saturday, august 22nd. >> we're hoping luck holds when it comes to hurricane bill. there's a shot from space. a storm as big as texas. looks like it may veer north and not hit the east coast directly. but it is still likely to produce heavy rains, dangerous rip currents. we have marysol out on long island. stephanie sy up in massachusetts. we'll bring you the latest, coming up. >>> also this morning, could you ever forgive someone responsible for the death of a loved one? we've heard a lot of outrage in the last few days from some of the families of the lockerbie bombing victims after the bomber was set free in libya. others have forgiven him. and they say it's helped them come to grips with the tragedy. we're going to explore the roots of forgiveness and whether it works. >>> also on the topic of forgiveness, green bay packer fans will never forgive brett favre for suiting up for the minnesota vikings last night, hatred will be white-hot for many years to come. after a very controversial week. all the drama he played for a all of two minutes on t
in -- accountable. we must and against a subtle but growing tierney of our time. we must take america back. thank you very much. and [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please give a hand to a leader in the conservative movement. the author of "leave us alone", groverno grover norquist. >> after the 2008 election, our friends on the left have some advice for a spread they suggested we move to the left and stop talking about taxes and spending. it was very similar to the advice they give us after goldwater lost in 1964, after watergate in 1974 and in 1992. the other team always cheerfully advises not to be us. they said please stop talking about taxes. this reminds me of the scene late in the movie where the bad guy says to the heroine, put down the gun and we will talk. and the movie goes on for another 25 minutes. they give us this advice because they understand that would strengthen as the center-right movement is our opposition to big government, our support for liberty and desire to have lower taxes and regulation and more freedom. but our coalition holds together because everybody here and e
that freedom and choice is what america has thrived on, and spread it around the world. going back to government control and everybody in taking all our money is not going to solve anything. host: caller, it is over to the sentiment by the cia director that it is time to move on to the business of protecting the country and not dwell on the past. caller: absolutely, absolutely. we are in a place where nobody has ever been before, and going back to the past is not going to help. host: thanks for calling. pablo on the line for democrats from brownsville, texas. caller: there are issues that have never even been discussed. host: like what? caller: there is a lot of secrecy and the cia and it goes back to a lot of people in my family who are now gone and not on this earth, but they worked for the defense department. there is something critical here. do we want the truth on everything? we want accountability. accountability to the people, our congress, and to our president. period. it is that simple. god bless you c-span for everything you do for public information and for freedom of sp
. i don't quite get that but they do. america is a conservative company with a small c in this way. they all say they want change but they don't want quite as much as they think they want when they get in the ballot box. and so you can't change the system and push everybody in a certain way they don't want to go. so in 2004 i said, you know, let's keep the employer-based system is because i think you need to give the american people the choice and if that's what they want, let them choose that. that's why obama's bill -- i'm such a fan of obama's bill. that's howard dean's version of healthcare, 2004. insure everybody under 30. let everybody else buy into medicare or keep their private insurance if you want. now here's what i like obama's bill. it gets back to choice. we have failed to insure people in this country not just because the insurance companies spend a lot of money with harry and lewis who have endorsed health insurance now. we failed because we tried to make the american people do something they didn't want to do. 80% of the people in this country have insurance. of tho
they and other things threatening to the america future for enterprise. i am glad they had to stop and come back. i think the cooperatives are a much better idea than a government am run healthcare system for americans. it's failed policy and it's foolish politics. >> i still, governor in your state you ran a wonderful state lots of poor folks in arkansas and what are they going to do if they get sick? are they going to go to the emergency room? isn't that why we started? aren't we gabbing to square one? we have been having all of this impassioned debate. fooch are people welling and being yelled at. >> before this was an s chip we did our program first that put a safety net under people who's children were making too much money for medicaid but not muf f enough for the private insurance party. there was buy in. there was responsibility. it worked beautifully. when the president comes out and said there are 47 million uninsured americans the reality geraldo there are a lot of those people who couldn't be insured they choose not to be because they would rather spends their money on a new car ther
attracted interest from america's beat necks in the 1950's. coincidentally with the interest of american diplomats and the central intelligence agency, people like jack karowac, who was an absolutely unknown writer, were developing an interest in buddhism, generally. first in zen buddhism and secondly through the work of robert campbell in buddhism. the mid 1950's were a period of cultural ferment in the united states with the beat neck movement that would eventually become the support basis for the tibetan resistance, but eventually took about 20 years, because something else was happening in 1955 when geshae sailed into new york harbor. here in washington, d.c., president eisenhower was trying to figure out how best to fight against international communism. in a series of national security council meetings throughout 955, he had been presented with options from open warfare to covert sub version of russian and chinese communist activity around the world. it was only recently learned that in the early 1950's, the u.s. intelligence services had picked up definitive information that russi
as they provide their and set. the supreme court, home to america's highest court. >> private donations? >> grants, and stuff like that. >> donations? >> i do not know. >> federally? >> america's cable companies created a c-span as a public service, a private business initiative. no government mandate. no government money. "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now for a discussion of if anything and everything. ron, and lilnda, she is a political correspondent for the christian science monitor -- that is lilnda. so, the obama family goes off for a week of fun. there will begin to run ads in that local market. would you make of this? guest: it shows two things -- the president never truly goes on vacation. he can put on a good show of being at the beach. he does not have to turn on his tv. he can to net this out. president obama is pretty good at controlling what he pays attention to. he manages his own the time. host: here is this headline that obama tackles the health care reformers. he has been trying to do that all week. how is he doing in this critical area? guest: it shows how far
-span. this is c-span, public affairs programming, courtesy of america's cable companies. up next, we have president obama on a recent unemployment figures and then senator mel martinez announces his resignation. >> yesterday, the full senate confirmed judge sonia is a full supreme court justice. -- judge sonia sotomayor as a full supreme court justice. then, enter the home of the country's highest court. >> and now president obama on the july unemployment numbers will show a decrease for the first time since april of last year. this is about five minutes. >> good afternoon, everybody. i would like to see it -- say a few words about the state of our economy and we're doing to put americans back to work and build a new foundation for growth. last week, we received a report on america's gross domestic product. today, we are pointed in the right direction. we pull the financial system back from the brink and the markets are restoring value to the 401k's. we have reduced the home payments on mortgages, making homes more affordable. we have helped to revive the credit markets and open up loans
at the national press club in washington and to our cspan audit across america and around the world. my name is a list of cordoba with the clear blue loose this -- clare booth luce organization. we are here to honor phyllis schlafly or staunch defense of traditional buyers and leading the pro-am the movement. luce institute supports women like phyllis schlafly. for more information, please call us at 88-891-4288. you can also visit our web site. zxhlet me welcome michelle eastn to present the award. [applause] >> thank you so much all of you for joining us today here at the national press club in washington, d.c. and welcome to the cspan audience as well. we are so happy today to have this special luncheon in honor of phyllis schlafly. we send a special thanks to roger milliken in south carolina who made this event possible with a gift. he has been supporting the clare booth luce policies for a long time. let me thank you for changing the lives of many young women all over america with your support for our outreach to young women and promotion of america's great women conservative leaders l
.d. power and associates. america's top rated internet--now even faster, and crystal clear phone service. all for just $79.99 a month for 6 months. plus, for a limited time, a free multi-room dvr for 3 months. that's an overall savings of $240 dollars over six months. don't miss this unbeatable value 3 great services, for the price of 2. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities at 800.974.6006 tty/v today. >> the hope rises again. and the dream lives on. [cheers] >> on this wednesday morning we get back to our top story, the death of senator ted kennedy. for over a half century we watched him grow up, mourn, make mistakes, run for president, be a liberal leader. we look back now at the keeper and casualty of camelot. >> reporter: to most americans ted kennedy was the staunch liberal with the famous last name. in reality, he was a legislative work horse, a millionaire who became a powerful advocate for the middle class. >> speed up. >> reporter: born in boston in 1932 edward moore kennedy was the last of nine children of joseph and rose fitzgerald kennedy. they would become
the very structure on which it rests. i call him jump skeet. being an american, working in america writing to convince americans of his pointed you must really be like having to tunnel through hardwood. chomsky is one of a small band of individuals fighting a coal industry and that makes them not only brilliant, but heroic. [applause] his work, so prolific, his personal support for so many so important. just this afternoon norm finkelstein was telling me how he had visited nome one summer at the beginning when he came back at the end and noam had already written two books, so he said to a friend, noam just finished two books and his friend said, so i read two books this summer to. he said no, but he wrote them. [laughter] and a think calling noam chomsky in turkey, it was february of 2002. he had not just gone there to speak, but to stand with the young publisher, who was facing years in prison for publishing noam chomsky's work. i called noam to interview him before he went to court, not knowing what would happen to him as well. when i rang him up, he answered the phone and he said amy, d
of the big payday are irresistible. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning. it is saturday, august 22nd. >> folks along the east coast, hoping for a little luck. trying to avoid this. take a look. goofy name, hurricane bill. impressive size. storm the size of texas. very powerful, making its way toward the east coast. look likes we'll avoid a direct hit. but it is likely to produce heavy rains, dangerous rip currents. and marysol live on long island. we also have a report further up the coast coming up in just a moment. >>> also this morning, could you ever forgive someone responsible for the death of a loved one. we've heard a lot of outrage in the last few days from some of the families of the lockerbie bombing victims after the bomber was set free in libya. others have forgiven him. and they say it's helped them come to grips with everything and dealing with the tragedy. we're going to explore the roots of forgiveness and whether it works. >>> also on the topic of forgiveness, green bay packer fans will never forgive brett favre for suiting up for the min
that celebrates black america. they are seeing the signature, yes, of abraham lincoln. many artifacts are being used as a hands on educational tool. it's the chevy open house. and now, with the cash for clunkers program, a great deal gets even better. let us recycle your older vehicle and you could qualify for an additional $3500 or $4500 cash back on a new, more fuel-efficient chevy. your chevy dealer has more eligible models to choose from. more than ford, toyota, or honda. now get an '09 cobalt for under $15,000 after all offers. and get it for even less if you qualify for cash for clunkers program. go to chevy.com for details. my name is chef michael. and when i come home from my restaurant, i love showing bailey how special she is. yes, you are. i know exactly what you love, don't i? - [ barks ] - mmm. aromas like rotisserie chicken. and filet mignon. yeah, that's what inspired a very special dry dog food. [ woman ] introducing chef michael's canine creations. so tasty and nutritious it's hard to believe it's dry dog food. chef-inspired. dog-desired.@i chef michael's canine creations. morn
in america. >> do you believe the country has the mood right now, given the economic challenges facing us, the loss of equity, the loss of property value, the loss of income, the loss of prospects for their children doing as well as they have in life, given all those pressures they'll willing to be big about health care? >> well, i think they're willing to accept the idea, as ted kennedy would have so enunciated. you must spike the cost of health care for all americans, particularly those who are currently paying the price. ted kennedy would have said five, six, seven years from now, you'll be paying double what you're paying if you leave the system intact as it is today. he would not have gone to the issue of how do you cover people not covered until he developed a relationship with those of us currently picking up the tab. i think that's what mr. obama has to do and he has to do it in memory of ted kennedy. >> is there anyone in the senate right now who might be willing to spend the next 10 or 20 years on how to be ted kennedy. somebody who knows how to be great legislator and can unite
-span funded? america's cable companies created c-span as a public service, a private business initiatives. no government mandate, no government money. >> the health secretary, kathleen sebelius, today said the government is expecting a swine flu outbreak later this year, similar to the outbreak that happened in the spring. she made the comments at a briefing on swine flu guidelines for employers and businesses. we will show you as much as we can before the white house briefing. >> come on up. there we go. >> close and personal. >> thank you all for joining us. the secretary of health and human services, kathleen sebelius, and janet napolitano and spent months on the forefront to combat the h1n1 swine flu virus. i am glad they joined us today to unveil this fall's guidance to help businesses and employers prepare for what many experts believe to be an active flu season. we're also joined by a doctor from the center for disease control, and the department of labour deputy secretary. they will be on hand to answer questions at the conclusion of our presentations. as all of you know, h1n1 is
. huh. the new lightweight hp mini netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. >> geraldo: dugard was found alive in antioch. she was found alive in antioch. there was nothing to indicate there was anything but a strange abduction. no connection to the family. literally snatched her off the streets. police officers found that he was on federal parole overseen by the california department of corrections and rehabilitation. he was convicted of crimes in 1971 involving rape and kidnapping. >> geraldo: damnit shelters should have checked his record when a deputy sheriff went into that backyard and didn't even check his criminal background. here google earth of the property of the perpetrator. this is the home and these blue objects are the tent. this is the compound in which they kept jaycee and her children. look at how close to the neighbor's yard it is. look at this. look at this. and that -- you have to tell me, dad, how those near
will spend the next hour of their day? first hour back in america? >> well, we're being told that they're going to have a family reunion at home rather than here at the hangar. that they're going to have private time with the families and then maybe come out and talk to us later on in the afternoon. so we're going to have to wait and see. we don't -- they appear to be in fairly good shape as they boarded the plane in pyongyang in north korea under their own esteem, and we'll have to wait and see how tired they are, what kind of shape they're in. >> so other than the obvious press gaggle in that hangar, and i presume security personnel, et cetera who else is there to greet both the former president and most importantly those journalists as they come off that plane? >> reporter: there are a few -- >> family members at all? >> reporter: we haven't seen any large groups of family members here yet. it could be that they're in a holding room that we don't know about, but we're not aware of any large amount of family members here. they have seats set up just off the site of where i'm standing
with a nuclear option. i think that america is against it. people in town hall meetings have the right to organize just like the left. host: this is an op-ed piece from "the new york times" this morning. "the legal america -- american needs to prepare for an early iraq exit. america's legal relationship with iraq is falling apart. nouri al maliki has announced a referendum next january on the agreement governs u.s. military operations. under the terms, military troops will have to leave the country in january, 2011, nearly one year earlier than planned." lisa, independent line. caller: i feel the same way as that person before who said that we should get out of afghanistan. we should learn from the russians. there is nothing that we can really do in that country. we are just wasting our lives. that is all a half to say. host: democratic line, minnesota. u.s. actions -- u.s. options in afghanistan? caller: we have got to leave. we are doing the same thing we did in iraq, playing these games that look like we are there to protect them. my bottom line is that we talked about spending mone
him. if everybody else knew what i knew about you. if america knew what you were like, one on one, personally. i would tell people about my encounters with him. just a few. but what a warm, wonderful guy, with a great sense of humor. again, guy on the opposite side politically of me, but a guy with no problem trying to reach out with republicans who used him as a punch line. >> you were talking a while ago about the issue of guns and the second amendment and conservatives and republicans. we don't know what the president is going to say when he steps up in front of the cameras at 9:30 or there abouts. one thing you can say about ted kennedy, take it to the bank truth, he was a man without cynicism. he was a man with no hate in his heart. in this day and age, when the bloggers and some of the cable chatter and the divisions in this country is so deep at that level, at the media level and the things that were written and said about him, right up until the moment he died. he had no hate in him. >> right. >> no cynicism about our government and our country. >> as doris said, he became
worthiy of the real discussion that america deserves one where we lower our voices listen to one another and talk with differences that really exist. >> now, a gop leader says there should be a bipartisan solution to reform and the republican radio and internet address, senator orrin hatch agreed that every citizen should have affordable and quality health care and adds americans should disagree respectfully. >> nearly 85% of americans have coverage. and they are really worried about what reform means for them, especially our seniors. and these concerns are moving from kitchen table conversations to town hall discussions. i am disappointed about the attempts to characterize the behavior of americans expressing their concerns as "un-american." although i vongly encourage the use of respectful debate in these town halls we should not be stifling these discussions. there is nothing un-american about disagreements. in fact, our great nation was founded on speak our minds. families are voicing their concerns because they feel like they are not being heard in washington and i'm here to tell yo
coast. eleven o'clock in the westment welcome to america's news headquarters covering all of the day's headlines. i'm trace gallagher live in new york. . >> i'm martha mccallum live at our lady of perpetual health basilica in massachusetts as we cover the funeral of edward kennedy. a plane carrying the nartsenatos casket expected to land at andrews air force base. you're looking at constitution avenue, along the procession route and the skies are much sunnier than in massachusetts. earlier today, we watched as hundreds of friends, family, colleagues, packed into basilica behind me and they honored and celebrated the life of the senator who passed away at age 77 this week after a long battle with brain canc cancer. senator kennedy served 47 years in the u.s. senate, making what many say is a profound impact on u.s. life. president obama delivered the eulogy today at senator kennedy's funeral, let's take a listen. >> while he was seen by fiercest critics as a partisan lightning rod, that's not prism through which ted kennedy saw the world, nor was it the prism through which his colleag
to stand with you, to change america, to restore its future, to rise to our best ideals, and to elect barack obama president of the united states. >> by rhetorically passing the torch there in denver, he certainly helped. he loved the campaign trail, but he also loved plain old lawmaker, doing the work. it's a very rare senator who gets so much done so early and so late in a career. senator kennedy was that person back in from first president bush to gw butch. today, both president and vice president pay tribute to the teddy kennedy they knew, they respected, and they loved. >> since teddy's diagnosis last year, we've seen the courage with which he battled his illness. and while these months have no doubt been difficult for him, they've also let him hear from people in every corner of our nation and from around the world, just how much he meant to all of us. the outpouring of love, gratitude, and fond memories to which we've all borne witness is a testament to the way this singular figure in american history touched so many lives. his ideas and ideals are stamped on scores of laws and
are fighting fascism or something like it, or taking back america, is simply dishonest. kicking back america from whom? -- taking back america from him? the actual give-and-take has been at a premium and misinformation has been rampant. that is just a taste this morning from the baltimore paper. have you attended a town hall meeting? we want to hear from you. first up, on our republican line, marcia. caller: i actually wanted to attend one. i lifted up on the internet and called my representative, tim bishop of long island, and any information i have obtained is that he had won in the end of june. but he is not going to be holding any more. host: and what do you think about that? caller: he is our representative and i think he needs to hear what people say. when i hear that, that this is all a result of organization, i can speak for myself and probably others, that i have never called a representative or attended a town hall meeting. i am not a member of any organization, but i am so upset about this healthcare plan that it galvanized me to want to have my voice heard. host: if he were to he
. [applause] now, this is obviously a tough time for families in new hampshire and across america. six months ago, we were in the middle of the worst recession of our lifetimes. i want you to remember what things were like in january and february. we were losing about 700,000 jobs per month. economists of all stripes feared a second coming of the great depression. that was only six months ago. that is why we acted as fast as we could to pass a recovery act that would stop the freefall. i want to make sure everybody understands what we did. 1/3 of the money and recovery act but to tax cuts that have already started showing up in the paychecks of about 500,000 working families in new hampshire. [applause] 500,000 families in new hampshire. we also cut taxes for small businesses on the investments they make and over 300 new venture small businesses have qualified for new loans backed by the recovery act. now, that was 1/3 of the recover at. another 1/3 of the money and recovery act is for emergency relief for folks who have borne the brunt of this recession. we have extended unemployment benefit
. >> woodruff: senator edward kennedy, patriarch of america's best-known political family, often called the "liberal lion" of the senate, died at his home in hyannis port, massachusetts, last night after battling brain cancer for a little more than a year. during his 46 year tenure in washington, he pushed for legislation on education, poverty and health care. today he was widely remembered as a gifted leader and legislator. we begin our coverage with the personal memories of one of his closest friends in the senate, republican orrin hatch of utah. >> senator thank you very much for talking with us. >> so nice to be with you, judy. >> woodruff: what are you thinking and feeling on this day? >> naturally, i'm griefing. i knew ted was going to die but i prayed for him every day hoping for a miracle. i chatted with his wife, vicki, this morning and she of course was broken up but she was very, very kind and nice as she really is. i'm going to miss that man. we-- we-- i went back there to fight ted kennedy, and i think we fought each other for all of my 33 years, but when we got together, w
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